Home Lock Picking for Beginners (253) How to Pick Cross (Zeiss) Locks

(253) How to Pick Cross (Zeiss) Locks

182.67K
36

LockLab is Fan funded!  Help pay for stuff to review, break and talk trash about, and maybe even give away when we’re done.  Join the Tribe!

My vises are made by Panavise, a U.S. Company.  The one with the wide jaws is the model 350.  The smaller one is the model 301. Both have the 312 Base mount – www.panavise.com

LEAVE YOUR COMMENT

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

Comment(36)

  1. fun fact, the number 13 although generally considered "unlucky" in the west, is considered lucky in china. i wonder if they put 13 pins on purpose because of that. the chinese love their "lucky" numbers and symbols.

  2. "then you screw down a bit more" and it puts tension on the very ENDS of the tensioners and puts even more potentially destructive force on the tensioners… because there's nothing actually re-enforcing between the tines. Up and down, left and right, sure… the barrel helps there, but it's not helping the torque on the actual tines. Common problem with that specific tool.

  3. I think the brass plug hiding the set screw fell out before they had a chance to package it!
    I don't know if anybody noticed this and maybe I'm wrong, but to me the key looks like it's cast and not cut.(1:44).
    This tells me that all the locks probably would have the same keying. This Chinese lock only gives the illusion of security masquerading as a cross lock. It's nothing more than a useless lump of brass.

  4. What the fuck? What the fucking fuck? I make a security steel lock and then put a screw in it that holds it together? This is beyond my understanding…  I guess banks should make new pin numbers. Make them at least 15 digits long so no one can hack anyones account and for security reasons they should put all the pin numbers on the internet. In that way if you forget your pin number, you can just look it up…

  5. 7:50 shows the "simple" dimple ON the cylinder wall itself, that the set-screw locked into (thus retaining the outer cylinder, & stopping it from rotating to open the lock – irrespective of which key was inserted, even IF that set-screw hole had been plugged)

  6. Hopefully this is not indicative of the lock quality at the real Fort Knox…
    "Here is our vault door – it requires seven individual combinations, each person knows only their own combination, so it requires seven people to open…"
    BosnianBill: "What does this screw do?"  *unscrews set screw, combination locks pop out revealing actuators*

  7. why is beyond me is why have the bothered putting in 13 pins when it can be opened with a screwdriver? why not just put 1 pin in just so it "works" as a lock jesus… it isnt a lock its just a fancy cabletie

LEAVE YOUR COMMENT

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com